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VT750 DC clutch pack replacement
Old 06-28-2016, 06:09 PM   #1
Jarden714
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VT750 DC clutch pack replacement

OK, getting ready to do rear sprocket change and while I'm at it, change out the clutch plates n springs. The question is this. When pulling clutch center, which it appears is absolutely necessary to get to the plates, you first have to "unstake" the clutch center locknut AND even then..you need some godawful special tool, a "clutch center holder", to loosen the center lock nut. Does anyone know an easy way to unstake this center nut AND loosen it without the special tool! And I'm guessing the unstake procedure will make it necessary to get a new center lock nut..because it will be unable to be "re-staked." The whole thing seems a little over engineered imho. Ive replaced clutch packs before without all this ....crap...but...it is what it is. Any experience and or advice would be greatly appreciated.
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Old 11-04-2016, 06:24 PM   #2
TimmyTheHog
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yay! I mean boo...So I am not the only one who is suffering regarding to the clutch plate changes...

bump for those who has done it before...
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Old 11-07-2016, 11:25 AM   #3
Kjoeller1986
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Did you get your clutch fixed?

I've changed many clutch's also on the VT750 (RC50). You don't need these tools, but they do the job easier.

I will definetly recommend you to buy the LUCAS clutch with springs, clutch plates and discs. Then you will have the longest life for your clutch.

You need to change the nut to a new one. You can't reuse the old one, because it has been "hitted".


Regards
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Old 11-07-2016, 12:27 PM   #4
TimmyTheHog
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kjoeller1986 View Post
Did you get your clutch fixed?

I've changed many clutch's also on the VT750 (RC50). You don't need these tools, but they do the job easier.

I will definetly recommend you to buy the LUCAS clutch with springs, clutch plates and discs. Then you will have the longest life for your clutch.

You need to change the nut to a new one. You can't reuse the old one, because it has been "hitted".


Regards
For the tools, if not using those special ones, what did you use?

For the nut, how did you just grind the nuts right out?

not sure about OP, but I am afraid to take it apart until I can figure it all out lol...
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Old 11-07-2016, 03:20 PM   #5
Kjoeller1986
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TimmyTheHog View Post
For the tools, if not using those special ones, what did you use?

For the nut, how did you just grind the nuts right out?

not sure about OP, but I am afraid to take it apart until I can figure it all out lol...
If you don't feel comfortable about changing it, i may not recommend trying yourself.

You need new gasket for the engine cover. On the VT750 C 2004 -up they use liquid gasket. Blue Permatex is great, my recommendation.

You take a dot marker (for iron before drilling / marker tool), and hit the nut with a hammer so you loose the lock effect on the nut. You may do this some times, be careful for the other parts, when you hit it.

I use a big Flathead screwdriver locking the clutch taps (where the springs are located). Loose the clutch nut, with a air tool. So you "knock" the nut loose.

Then inspect the clutch housing slots, if they have grooves, you need to sand them smooth with fine sanding paper. My clutch with only 5500 miles, had grooves and that was why i opend the clutch on mine. Look in your Clymer manual, that explains everything. My clutch did not operate correct, because of the grooves in the slots. It solved my problem, after sanding for 4 hours.....

When everything's OK, you need to oil up all the discs and clutch plates in new engine oil (over night or at least some hours).

Secure the clutch housing with all parts, and be sure that the sprocket are located correct. It has to go all the way in, on the axle.

"I can't upload picture, but send me you mail adress, and i can send you pictures"

It's a bit difficult to locate the clutch housing back on the axle, you need to be sure, that the sprockets are lined up and touching each other (like on the picture).

Then assemble reverse, new lock nut. Tighten with Flathead screwdriver and by hand with your spanner tool. When you can't tighten it anymore "with a careful arm", then take your air tool and on the easiest setting, give it 5 short shots. Still use your flathead, and lock the clutch house when tightning. Then its tightened (it's to difficult to tight it with a torque tool here). Then hit the new nut with the dot marker, so it's secured.

Remember to oil up the parts in the engine cover, clutch leaver parts. It's so smooth when it's lubricated before assembling

Then clean the surfaces on the block, and the engine cover with cleaning gasoline or ethanol.

Last edited by Kjoeller1986 : 11-08-2016 at 06:58 AM.
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Old 11-07-2016, 03:44 PM   #6
TimmyTheHog
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kjoeller1986 View Post
If you don't feel comfortable about changing it, i may not recommend trying yourself.

You need new gasket material, i prefer the blue permatex. Remove the old one, and clean surfaces down. A hobby knife is useful (the top of the blade facing down, not the cutting side).

You take a dot marker (for iron before drilling), and hit the nut with a hammer so you loose the lock effect on the nut. You may do this some times, be careful for the other parts, when you hit it.

I use a big Flathead screwdriver locking the clutch taps (where the springs are located). Loose the clutch nut, with a air tool. So you "knock" the nut loose.

Then inspect the clutch housing slots, if they have grooves, you need to sand them smooth with fine sanding paper. My clutch with only 5500 miles, had grooves and that was why i opend the clutch on mine. Look in your Clymer manual, that explains everything. My clutch did not operate correct, because of the grooves in the slots. It solved my problem, after sanding for 4 hours.....

When everything's OK, you need to oil up all the discs and clutch plates in new engine oil (over night or at least some hours).

Secure the clutch housing with all parts, and be sure that the sprocket are located correct. It has to go all the way in, on the axle.

"I can't upload picture, but send me you mail adress, and i can send you pictures"

It's a bit difficult to locate the clutch housing back on the axle, you need to be sure, that the sprockets are lined up and touching each other (like on the picture).

Then assemble reverse, new lock nut. Tighten with Flathead screwdriver and by hand with your spanner tool. When you can't tighten it anymore, then take your air tool and on the easiest setting, give it 5 short shots. Then its tightened (it's to difficult to tight it with a torque tool here). Then hit the new nut with the dot marker, so it's secured.

Remember to oil up the parts in the engine cover, clutch leaver parts. It's so smooth when it's lubricated before assembling

Then clean the surfaces on the block, and the engine cover with cleaning gasoline or ethanol.
You sir are awesome!

I have just PM'ed you my e-mail address for the pictures :)

Considered myself as a novice mech guy, but quite new at this...so ya I am a noob :P
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Old 11-07-2016, 04:17 PM   #7
Kjoeller1986
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TimmyTheHog View Post
You sir are awesome!

I have just PM'ed you my e-mail address for the pictures :)

Considered myself as a novice mech guy, but quite new at this...so ya I am a noob :P
Thank's, i've been driving many miles on motorbikes and fix everything in my own garage. Then i know, it's done correct.

Have been driving for 10 years and 69000 miles on the road ;) So i like to wash bikes (look like new is what i prefer), polish them, fix them, maintaining them - and drive them.. hehe

7500 miles this season (8 months) on my new shadow aero


Do you have the chain drive Shadow 750? I thought it was the shaft drive you have, but i read about a sprocket....
Remember, its only necessary to change clutch if it slips in gear or you don't have any travel on your leaver. If it aint broke, don't fix it :)

Last edited by Kjoeller1986 : 11-07-2016 at 04:22 PM.
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Old 11-07-2016, 06:02 PM   #8
TimmyTheHog
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kjoeller1986 View Post
Thank's, i've been driving many miles on motorbikes and fix everything in my own garage. Then i know, it's done correct.

Have been driving for 10 years and 69000 miles on the road ;) So i like to wash bikes (look like new is what i prefer), polish them, fix them, maintaining them - and drive them.. hehe

7500 miles this season (8 months) on my new shadow aero


Do you have the chain drive Shadow 750? I thought it was the shaft drive you have, but i read about a sprocket....
Remember, its only necessary to change clutch if it slips in gear or you don't have any travel on your leaver. If it aint broke, don't fix it :)
awesome!

I got everything except the air tool LOL...guess there are some thing to consider for my "Christmas Presents" list

And yes, my model is chain drive. VT750DC

I believe VT750C & Aero are shaft drive...

The main reason why I wanna take a look at the clutch is I dropped my bike earlier this year, and my clutch lever/cable was hit and gotten loose. I am on a paranoid side so was "hoping" to "quickly" pop open clutch case and inspect for damage.

But I had been riding since the drop and doesn't feel like any clutch slippage...

I might take your advise and to just leave it alone...and yes, if it ain't broke, I ain't fixing it.

Thanks again!
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Old 11-07-2016, 06:29 PM   #9
Kjoeller1986
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TimmyTheHog View Post
awesome!

I got everything except the air tool LOL...guess there are some thing to consider for my "Christmas Presents" list

And yes, my model is chain drive. VT750DC

I believe VT750C & Aero are shaft drive...

The main reason why I wanna take a look at the clutch is I dropped my bike earlier this year, and my clutch lever/cable was hit and gotten loose. I am on a paranoid side so was "hoping" to "quickly" pop open clutch case and inspect for damage.

But I had been riding since the drop and doesn't feel like any clutch slippage...

I might take your advise and to just leave it alone...and yes, if it ain't broke, I ain't fixing it.

Thanks again!


Okay, i'm quite sure that the clutch and main block are the same on the chain drive vs. shaft. Only design and other things have been modified, also the fuel system. I've seen the Shadow Spirit C2 2007, called the DC model also. Thought it was the same you have.
https://www.google.dk/search?q=vt+75...D5ij6O36nTM%3A

The Spirit and Aero are shaft driven from 2004 and up.

Send me some pictures of your bike and the lever, cable, and down to the engine. Then i can see if something looks wrong.
- Maybe your cable has moved, and thats why you feel a difference. Is the handlebar straight, when driving in a straight line?
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Old 11-07-2016, 07:55 PM   #10
TimmyTheHog
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kjoeller1986 View Post
Okay, i'm quite sure that the clutch and main block are the same on the chain drive vs. shaft. Only design and other things have been modified, also the fuel system. I've seen the Shadow Spirit C2 2007, called the DC model also. Thought it was the same you have.
https://www.google.dk/search?q=vt+75...D5ij6O36nTM%3A

The Spirit and Aero are shaft driven from 2004 and up.

Send me some pictures of your bike and the lever, cable, and down to the engine. Then i can see if something looks wrong.
- Maybe your cable has moved, and thats why you feel a difference. Is the handlebar straight, when driving in a straight line?
Sent you an e-mail with bunch of pictures of what I got.

As mentioned in the e-mail, handle bar seems okay and the bike rode straight for the summer after the drop and repair.

but if you spot anything kinky, , please let me know.

Thank you!

P.S. I noticed I have just hi-jacked this thread LOL...
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