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Cheap DIY Swingarm Bag
Old 01-27-2017, 11:06 PM   #1
Motheelectrician
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Cheap DIY Swingarm Bag

Thought I would share something that I did that really seems to work really good. I recently posted a thread on how I built a homemade solo bag in the 750 Spirit Mod forum. Not sure if that's where it should have gone...I have a Spirit....and I did build it for that Spirit...but I didn't actually mod the Spirit....I don't know. So many rules!! Hopefully I won't get bashed too hard if I shouldn't have posted it there. ANYWAYS...so as in that thread, I'm on a budget and really have a hard time paying $100 for a little tiny pouch that you can't put much more that a pair of glasses and some gloves in. So I started thinking and searching and searching and searching... Found a few cheap options on ebay, but wasn't sure if they would last and most of the ones I found were too long for my shaft drive anyways. I had plenty of vinyl used on the solo bag left, so I decided to try to build this bag also. Similarly to the solo bag, I set out on a search for something to use as a shell to give the bag some structure. After about a tank of gas running around town, I ended back at my shop. Really hadn't found anything that I thought would meet all of the requirements that I had thought of...cheap, sturdy, light, the right shape, etc... so after a couple of cold beers and some piddling in the shop, I saw it sitting in the corner covered in dust. A piece of 4" PVC Sewer and Drain left over from a VERY shitty day last year....literally.

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Old 01-27-2017, 11:10 PM   #2
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Again, used a plastic storage container lid for the ends/sides and found some small L brackets in my hardware drawer. A few rivets and the shell was pretty much done.

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Old 01-27-2017, 11:14 PM   #3
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Also found an old piano hinge that I cut to length and hammered into shape with a ball peen hammer and a vice. Used rivets to secure the hinge and the ends.

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Old 01-27-2017, 11:17 PM   #4
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You may notice that the door isn't centered in the pipe. I did this to clear the passenger foot pegs on my '07 750 Spirit. I know a lot of people cut them off, but I have a wonderful wife that really doesn't give me a hard time about anything. She hasn't ridden with me yet, but I want my bike to be ready if she ever gives it a shot!

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Old 01-27-2017, 11:29 PM   #5
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As mentioned before, I had some vinyl left over from a previous project, so it was convenient to keep the pattern the same. I used spray adhesive to glue the fabric on the ends first, allowing a little extra fabric to wrap the corners. I don't have any close up pictures of exactly what I did to get the fabric not to bunch on the round corners, but I will try to explain. I made sure that the fabric on the flat part of the ends was good and flat with no wrinkles first, then started wrapping the corners. Starting in one spot, I would stick about a pinky finger at a time down. Then I would allow the extra material between the small sections that I stuck down to fold or bunch. Kinda picture pinching the extra material with your thumb and index fingers. After I got it stuck all the way around with a small spot stuck down, then a fold, small spot stuck down, then a fold, all the way around, I pinched the fold tight and cut it off with scissors. You can kinda see in the picture. I've already cut the folds off here. You can see the little triangle shaped pieces of fabric on the table.

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Old 01-27-2017, 11:33 PM   #6
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To do the rest of the bag, I just cut a strip the width of my pipe and wrapped around it until it overlapped and using a razor knife and a straight edge, cut through both layers for a perfect seam. Completely covered the door, hinge, and all.

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Old 01-27-2017, 11:38 PM   #7
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You can kind of see in this picture, after vinyl was glued down, I used the razor knife again to cut the fabric in the crack where the door was in the pipe. I forgot to add that I had to cut a small piece of plastic from my trusty container lid and rivet it to the inside of the pipe right at the bottom of the opening so that the door wouldn't close all the way into the pipe. I think you can see it in the second picture.


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Old 01-27-2017, 11:45 PM   #8
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Built my mounting brackets out of some shelving material that I had laying around. A hacksaw, a couple of different files, and a ball peen hammer helped the shaping.



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Old 01-27-2017, 11:53 PM   #9
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Flattened the ends with a hammer and slotted them so that I could just loosen the bolts securing the drive shaft cover to the rear differential and insert.



Used some small bolts and fender washers to bolt bag to mounting bracket.

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Old 01-27-2017, 11:56 PM   #10
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To clean it up a little, I painted the mounting brackets black and also wrapped the top of the bracket (the only part you can see at all) with a strip of fabric. Used an awl to punch some holes in the fabric and riveted to the top rail of bracket. I used a sharpie marker to color in the heads of the rivets so they didn't show up so bad against the black fabric.

You can see the top rail covered with fabric a little here.

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