| Main Page | Shadow Forums | Motorcycle Links | Shadowrider's Photo Gallery | Today's Posts | New Posts |



DO NOT POST NUDITY OR PORN OR IT WILL BE DELETED! Thank you.

  
Go Back   Shadowriders > Honda Shadow Discussion Forums > How-To Guides
User Name
Password
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes

Installing a custom air filter/intake on the 750 ACE or Spirit
Old 03-05-2014, 03:42 PM   #1
bob_suruncle
Ace Rider, SROC Brother
 
bob_suruncle's Avatar
 
bob_suruncle is Offline
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 2,009
Installing a custom air filter/intake on the 750 ACE or Spirit

Figured this was long overdue

This install is on my 2000 ACE 750 but many of the ideas and concepts will work on the Spirit as well. Thanks to Aced it, Custom Crzy and Swilly who all went down a very similar path before me and provided some of the preliminary information I needed to work out my installation.

NOTE: You WILL have to re-jet after this modification!


Tools required:
Sharpie marker
utility knife
plastic sheet or cardboard for a template
sheet metal
screws or pop rivets
RTV sealant
jigsaw with metal cutting blade
drill and some bits


Considerations before you start:

The faux cooling fins on the front cylinder of the ACE do not continue around behind the stock air box so if you plan to go with a smaller filter you will need to consider how you will cover up this gap in the fins. Many take a set of fins from the left side rear cylinder and modify them to fit the area but it does take some grinding to make everything fit so be forewarned.

Here is a link to the fin mod: http://whytlash.powweb.com/finmod/finmod.htm

Step 1: pick your filter. If you donít want to do the fin mod noted above then pick something large enough to cover the missing fins. A number of people have installed an Edelbrock pro-flo filter but I wanted to be different and went with this oval filter that was originally designed to fit Weber carbs on cars like the Austin Healey. Note: there are 2 sizes of the style filter I purchased one is 7" x 4" which will not cover the missing fins and the other is 9.25" x 5.5" which is what I purchased. Be really careful with the sizing as this style of filter is available for Harley's but is almost always the smaller version so be sure to get measurements. Whatever you choose, it is easiest to work with a filter that has a flat steel backing plate to allow modification to fit the rubber connector for the intake on the ACE. Here is the filter I chose:



Most filters will need to be modified to work on the ACE so to that end, I first made a template from plastic that matched the dimensions of the filter backing plateÖ. Itís better to toss out a couple of pieces of plastic if the alignment is off than it is to cut up your new filter incorrectly!



Once you start cutting on the actual filter there is no going back so think things through first!

__________________

Last edited by bob_suruncle : 06-30-2017 at 12:51 PM.
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-05-2014, 03:45 PM   #2
bob_suruncle
Ace Rider, SROC Brother
 
bob_suruncle's Avatar
 
bob_suruncle is Offline
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 2,009
Once I had my template, I cut out an appropriate size/shape hole for the rubber connecting boot that runs to the air box under the fuel tank. To lay this out, I installed the boot on the intake under the tank and held my template up and aligned it by eye. I then transferred some reference marks onto my template with magic marker. Take everything back off the bike and using the reference points, align the triangular throat of the rubber connector on your template and trace its outline. You can then use this line to cut the opening for the rubber connector; remembering to cut inside the lines by about ľ” and then use a file to fine tune the opening until the rubber connector fits snugly into the opening.





Now you can reinstall the rubber connector to the bike with the template, work out final alignment and decide on locations for hard mounting points. The template gives you the opportunity to make sure the missing cooling fins on the front cylinder are not visible when the filter is installed.

__________________

Last edited by bob_suruncle : 06-30-2017 at 12:56 PM. Reason: Photobucket sucks
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-05-2014, 03:50 PM   #3
bob_suruncle
Ace Rider, SROC Brother
 
bob_suruncle's Avatar
 
bob_suruncle is Offline
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 2,009
Once you are happy with the alignment, it’s time to modify the back of your filter to fit the rubber connector. In my case and probably in yours as well, there were holes in the backing plate that were in less than favorable positions and needed to be filled in. To deal with this, cut and shape a piece of sheet metal to cover all of the holes and attach it to the filter.



I attached mine to the inside of the backing plate using pop rivets to keep things neat and low profile on the back of the filter.



Now that you have a solid surface to work with, transfer the cutout from your template to the back of the filter.

__________________

Last edited by bob_suruncle : 06-30-2017 at 12:59 PM. Reason: Photobucket sucks
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-05-2014, 03:53 PM   #4
bob_suruncle
Ace Rider, SROC Brother
 
bob_suruncle's Avatar
 
bob_suruncle is Offline
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 2,009
To cut the opening for the rubber connector I used a jigsaw with a fine tooth metal cutting blade. Before I made the actual cuts, I drilled Ĺ” holes at each “corner” to match up with the contours of the rubber connector and to give me somewhere to insert the blade to start my cut.



Point of interest: Pay attention when you are cutting and use slow speeds to reduce vibration… I did not pay attention and took a couple of bites out of the edge of my work bench as a result.



Once you have the opening cut out, you can dry fit the rubber connector to your filter. I had to do some extra work with a file and Dremel to smooth and slightly enlarge the opening. Install the rubber connector and test fit on your bike….. Looking good! But we aren’t done yet!!
__________________

Last edited by bob_suruncle : 06-30-2017 at 01:01 PM. Reason: Photobucket sucks
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-05-2014, 03:58 PM   #5
bob_suruncle
Ace Rider, SROC Brother
 
bob_suruncle's Avatar
 
bob_suruncle is Offline
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 2,009
Assuming everything aligns nicely and the filter is sitting level, you now need to make some mounting points so the filter doesn’t fly off while riding. My filter is much narrower than the Edelbrock units used by others so I had to turn the front stock mounting point counter clockwise about 45 degrees to get my mounting point far enough inboard from the outside edge of the filter.



Once everything is lined up, mark the mount locations on the back of the filter with a marker and then drill those locations to fit stainless eye-bolts. The eye-bolts allow you to use the stock fasteners to hold everything in place. Use nylock nuts or some Locktite on the nuts for the eye-bolts and cut off any access length with a Dremel.





Now all that is left to do is run a bead of RTV sealant around the rubber connector boot, install the filter and tighten everything up!. Final jetting will depend on exhaust modifications and the altitude of the area you live in.

Final jetting for my bike was as follows:

Front 134
Rear 138
Main #42
Needles groove 3

EDIT.... after riding for a few weeks and finding my plugs getting a bit black I moved the clips on the needles up to the 2nd groove with one shim and the bike is running spectacularly!!... amazing how much difference that fraction of an inch makes to performance



I did not go into detail on Jet installation as that is covered elsewhere by others. Final results may vary but with the new filter, jetting and Hardkrome pipes I have an increase of 2 HP bringing me up to 40HP; that is a nearly 10% increase over stock advertised number of 37HP and a 5%+ increase over the way she was with just pipes.

Final result. Much better clearance for my knee now and it looks really cool!:



Have Fun!
__________________

Last edited by bob_suruncle : 06-30-2017 at 01:03 PM. Reason: updated information
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-06-2014, 12:39 AM   #6
custm crzy
Made In The USA
 
custm crzy's Avatar
 
custm crzy is Offline
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: South GA
Posts: 1,629
excellent write up brother... i nominate sticky..
__________________
03 ACE 750
05 vlx bobber (The wifes)
06 FLHXi Street Glide
1980 KZ750 bobber/chopper project
07 KX250F


  Reply With Quote

Old 03-06-2014, 01:02 AM   #7
tgmotoman
Shadow Master
 
tgmotoman's Avatar
 
tgmotoman is Offline
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Midland, TX
Posts: 155
Looks great, very good write up also. Thanks Bob.
__________________
---
'03 Shadow Spirit 750DC
"work in progress"

  Reply With Quote

Old 03-06-2014, 09:27 AM   #8
bob_suruncle
Ace Rider, SROC Brother
 
bob_suruncle's Avatar
 
bob_suruncle is Offline
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 2,009
thanks guys!
__________________
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-06-2014, 10:46 AM   #9
Keviness
Shadow Rider
 
Keviness's Avatar
 
Keviness is Offline
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Holland Michigan
Posts: 54
That looks great, nice work!
__________________
Kevin
1993 VLX 600
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-06-2014, 09:27 PM   #10
hondaboi
Shadow Master
 
hondaboi's Avatar
 
hondaboi is Offline
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Toronto Canada
Posts: 228
Great write up, gonna have to find a filter to do this mod, did you get the filter locally or eBay?
__________________
  Reply With Quote



Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Forum Jump



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 12:26 PM.


vBulletin skin developed by: eXtremepixels
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.